LIVING

With EoE, Allergies, Asthma and a G-Tube

Scope Number 3 in Ohio

Off we went. Six humans, one bearded dragon, 3 dwarf hamsters, plus one more on antibiotics. We made the days long journey to Ohio, dumped our stuff at my parents house then Nathan, Gage, Tinleigh and I headed back out the next day to Cincinnati for their scopes.

Gage was going to be scoped to check and make sure his steroids were still working. He had been a snotty gunky mess since summer. We weren’t sure if it was Ige allergies or his EoE flaring. Tinleigh was being scoped because she had started steroids 3 months prior along with all fruits and vegetables she isn’t allergic to.

As we packed up and left Tinleigh was crying as she had been for 2 weeks prior when she learned scope time was coming. We assured her everything would be okay and distracted her with different thoughts.

My kids have stayed at hotels so many times, but it never gets old. They love it. Which in my book is a plus. It makes them happy and they feel fancy. I want these rock stars to always feel that way.

We arrive at the hospital the next morning and begin the normal check in procedures. Tinleigh is just fine. She had cried before bedtime so I was happy to see her smiling. We moved into our room and went through the million question interview as we always do. Gage and Tinleigh were happily distracted on their tablets.

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Gage gowned up, climbed on the bed and received his loopy meds. He giggled and laughed as the effects set in. I walked with him into the OR. Kissed his head and held his hand as they put the IV in and drew blood. Then he was off to sleep. I made my way back to our room and opened the door to find Tinleigh sitting on Nathan’s lap crying. Not hysterical, but weeping and very upset her time was about to come. I got her onto the bed and convinced her to change her shirt into the gown. The anesthesiologist came in with a syringe and extension so we could administer a new cocktail of drugs in her tube. At first she covered her button and refused. We gently told her things would be okay and she let the doctor push the drugs into her button. She cried as the medicine began working. I hugged her and held her tight kissing her and whispering that everything would be okay. The doctor came in with Gage’s update and I knew it was go time. I released Tinleigh to find she had fallen to sleep. The nurse started to move the bed and Tinleigh didn’t flinch. We wheeled her down the hall and for the first time ever Tinleigh slept during this process. I felt relief coming over me seeing this new drug cocktail was working. They pushed her into the OR, placed the laughing gas mask on her face and began prepping her arm for her IV. Her little eyed popped open. My heart sank. She began trying to yell at the doctor. Her words were muffled by the mask. Tears fell from her eyes as I got right down in her face so she could see me. I repeatedly told her she was okay. She was frozen, couldn’t move, but was definitely trying to communicate with us. It seemed like forever but was probably 1 minute before the doctor drew blood then administered the anesthesia. I kissed her on the forehead and left the room.

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When I met her in recovery she opened her eyes and said what happened? I asked her what she remembered. She asked if she fell asleep. I told her she fell asleep in the room before we wheeled her back. She didn’t remember at all. I was so happy! Then the anesthesiologist popped in. He asked how she was. I told him fine and that she doesn’t remember a thing. He then informed me that in all his 26 years, adults and kids, he’s never had anyone be able to form words while on that combination of drugs. I said well, now you’ve met Tinleigh.

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Later in the hotel I recorded Tinleigh telling me that her scope was a piece of cake and she liked the new medicine. Also, that next time she won’t be scared. This I will use before her next scope to remind her everything was okay.

So we now have a bit of confirmation that Tinleigh’s body doesn’t metabolize drugs the way it should. What if in the future she ends up at an emergency room with no one to tell the doctor she needs extra drugs or certain ones to knock her out. I need to discuss this further with an anesthesiologist. Just another task on my list of things to do.

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The next day Gage had a 20 min blood work procedure done. We needed to test his cortisol function. This is because he is on such a high dose of steroids to be able to eat plus for his asthma. The steroids can cause the cortisol to stop being produced.

He passed!

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December 10, 2018 Posted by | daily life, Gage's allergies, LIVING, Tinleigh's allergies | , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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